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Religious “love”

In ethics, history, moral issues, people, philosophy, politics, relationship, religion, traditions on February 26, 2013 at 08:11
Lahore, Feb 21: A Pakistani court has begun hearing a petition seeking the reopening of an 84-year-old case in which a court under the British administration had given the death sentence to Ghazi Ilamuddin for murdering a Hindu writer named Raj Pal.

Lahore High Court Chief Justice Umer Ata Bandial heard arguments by the petitioner’s counsel on the maintainability of the plea yesterday and adjourned the case till March 14.

Ilamuddin killed Raj Pal for allegedly committing blasphemy against the Prophet Muhammad and was sentenced to death by British judges of the Lahore High Court in 1929.

Imtiaz Rasheed Qureshi of the “Save the Judiciary Committee” has filed the petition for reopening the case and exonerating Ilamuddin.

Farooq Hasan, the counsel for Qureshi, argued Raj Pal had included blasphemous material in his book and had “invited his death“.

He said: “Ghazi Ilamudin had no personal grudge with Pal and acted only out of love for the Prophet like a true Muslim.

Hasan requested the court to set aside the impugned order by exercising the principle of review.

Qureshi asked the court to direct authorities to honour Ilamuddin with state awards.

He also requested the court to direct the government to arrange a state funeral for Ilamuddin after declaring him “not guilty”.

You may think this is possible only in Pakistan and so on. Wrong. I have heard a person calling himself an Orthodox Christian saying “O, Lord, forgive us: we forgot how to die and kill for our faith”.

Remember the trial of  Pussy riot.  The patriarch of Moscow and All Russia, Kirill I, and Vsevolod Chaplin, chairman of the Synodal Department for the Cooperation of Church (Russia’s “Great Inquisitor”) condemned Pussy Riot’s actions as “blasphemous“, the patriarch was saying that the “Devil has laughed at all of us … We have no future if we allow mockery in front of great shrines, and if some see such mockery as a sort of bravery, an expression of political protest, an acceptable action or a harmless joke.”[65] 

Years in prison because somebody thinks they offended his imaginary friendHere a typical Orthodox fanatic says “no mercy” to them.

Remember the witches. There is no magic, of course, but christians are still afraid of it. “Witchcraft is dangerous“… You don’t find apologies to innocent ladies burned by priests here.

What C.S. Lewis says about this? A well-educated person. “Three hundred years ago people in England were putting witches to death. Was that what you call the ‘Rule of Human Nature or Right Conduct?’ But surely the reason we do not execute witches is that we do not believe there are such things. If we did—if we really thought that there were people going about who had sold themselves to the devil and received supernatural powers from him in return and were using these powers to kill their neighbours or drive them mad or bring bad weather—surely we would all agree that if anyone deserved the death penalty, then these filthy quislings did? There is no difference of moral principle here: the difference is simply about matter of fact. It may be a great advance in knowledge not to believe in witches: there is no moral advance in not executing them when you do not think they are there. You would not call a man humane for ceasing to set mousetraps if he did so because he believed there were no mice in the house.” 

Disgusting attitude: If you believe that somebody is evil it is moral to kill and torture. I can’t comprehend I used to like Lewis and agree with him when I was a Christian.

And we are back in Pakistan. If the religion was as strong in people’s heads in Europe today as it is in Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Afghanistan, etc, you think the Inquisition wouldn’t be back?

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