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Posts Tagged ‘culture’

On changing attitudes

In art, ethics, good life, moral issues, people, philosophy, religion, time, traditions, writing on March 2, 2013 at 12:51

“I don’t believe in witches, but I don’t call myself an ahexist.”- this is Jonathan Miller saying “No” to negative self-definition. Fortunately it is normal now in the West not to believe in witches and other supernatural stuff. Calling somebody atheist is a bit strange really.

Recently a woman came to my shop and asked me if I want some leaflets for single parents. .. I was a bit surprised and said I am not a single parent and she may leave her leaflets at the designated area of the Market. She wouldn’t leave. “Look, there is more useful information in there”. Even more surprised, I looked. After first paragraph the word “Bible” started to creep in. This is what it was all about! I asked her few questions about why she believed (“Jesus told me” and “it’s the most printed book in the world”), asked her about horrible facts from her favourite book (she approved genocide with ease) and shamed her for trying to brainwash people. And with stealth too – wich was dishonest and disgusting – but this shows how ashamed they are themselves about their own teachings.

Two Mormon girls who surrounded me on the street few days later have been slightly more open. “We do not trying to change your mind, just come to us and be happy! ” Really? What if I am already happy? No reply. Why do you believe the stuff you teach? “Because we feel that it is so”… Well, I don’t. The funniest thing was that they turned out to be from Russia too – in the middle of the conversation. Probably they were from the Ural or Siberia. New Russian export – the Mormons…

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In Uncategorized on August 15, 2012 at 13:58

a mature culture is one that wishes to know more about other cultures, that values the best examples of what it has of them, and that is better able to appreciate them because it has standarts and insights developed in appreciation of its own.

A.C. Grayling

Destroying World’s heritage again…

In Uncategorized on July 4, 2012 at 15:30

Max Fisher – Max Fisher is an associate editor at The Atlantic, where he edits the International channel.

These 600-Year Old World Heritage Sites Might Be Rubble by August

The West African city of Timbuktu used to be one of Africa’s richest and most important, a nexus of trade across the Sahara and a center of religious and scientific learning as far back as the 1400s. The relics of that history still stand in the form of such world heritage sites as the University of Sankore. More recently, this city in the sprawling West African country of Mali has been a tourism draw. But, on April 2, it came under new ownership: rebels from an ethnic minority known as Tuareg, who’d sought independence for years. Five days later they got it, declaring northern Mali as the independent country of Azawad. Then, on June 1, breakaway rebels with the extremist Islamist group Ansar Dine (translation: “Defenders of Faith”) took control of Timbuktu.

In their first month of rule, Ansar Dine has shut down the tourism industry (“We are against tourism. They foster debauchery,” a representative said), sent locals fleeing, and, over the past four days, destroyed half of the shrines that mark Timbuktu’s ancient and remarkable history. The United Nations condemned the destruction and the International Criminal Court suggested it could be a war crime, but Ansar Dine insisted they won’t slow down, later pulling a beautiful Gothic door off the Sidi Yahya mosque that became one of the world’s great centers of learning during the 1400s. They follow an extreme form of Islam (though a relatively modern one; it emerged in late-1700s Saudi Arabia) that sees Timbuktu’s shrines and mosque-universities as sacrilegious; a form of idol-worship. Their campaign is still going — it’s been compared to the Taliban’s early-2001 destruction of ancient Buddha statues — and some observers worry that many of Timbuktu’s historical treasures, which have survived countless invasions and empires, won’t live out the month. more: http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2012/07/under-attack-timbuktus-beautiful-historic-sites/259360/

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