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Posts Tagged ‘freedom of expression’

Cruel Law

In ethics, freedom, legal issues, moral issues, people, relationship, religion, traditions on February 27, 2013 at 16:37

Maldives girl to get 100 lashes for pre-marital sex

By Olivia Lang BBC News

Rights groups have urged the government to abolish the punishment

A 15-year-old rape victim has been sentenced to 100 lashes for engaging in premarital sex, court officials said.

The charges against the girl were brought against her last year after police investigated accusations that her stepfather had raped her and killed their baby. He is still to face trial.

Amnesty International condemned the punishment as “cruel, degrading and inhumane“.

….

Zaima Nasheed, a spokesperson for the juvenile court, said the girl was also ordered to remain under house arrest at a children’s home for eight months.

She defended the punishment, saying the girl had willingly committed an act outside of the law.

Officials said she would receive the punishment when she turns 18, unless she requested it earlier.

The case was sent for prosecution after police were called to investigate a dead baby buried on the island of Feydhoo in Shaviyani Atoll, in the north of the country.

Her stepfather was accused of raping her and impregnating her before killing the baby. The girl’s mother also faces charges for failing to report the abuse to the authorities.

The legal system of the Maldives, an Islamic archipelago with a population of some 400,000, has elements of Islamic law (Sharia) as well as English common law.

Ahmed Faiz, a researcher with Amnesty International, said flogging was “cruel, degrading and inhumane” and urged the authorities to abolish it.

“We are very surprised that the government is not doing anything to stop this punishment – to remove it altogether from the statute books.”

“This is not the only case. It is happening frequently – only last month there was another girl who was sexually abused and sentenced to lashes.”

He said he did not know when the punishment was last carried out as people were not willing to discuss it openly.” more

I think honest people should boycott countries which have laws like this. Other governments must put pressures on countries like that to abolish injustice and cruelty.

Maps of human potential and its waste

In взаимоотношения, мораль, наука, отношения, ethics, freedom, good life, legal issues, moral issues, религия, свобода, традиции, people, places, relationship, religion, traditions on February 11, 2013 at 08:59

First, two news items:


1. "Three-year-old girl joins Mensa with an IQ ‘higher than
Stephen Hawking’ to become just one of 18 pre-school members
  • Alice Amos, from Guildford, Surrey, scored 162 in the Stanford Binet test
  • The toddler is already bilingual, speaking both English and Russian
  • Her IQ matches some of the world's most notable intellectuals both past and present"
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2275775/Three-year-old-girl-joins-Mensa-IQ-higher-Stephen-Hawking-just-18-pre-school-members.html#ixzz2KZn9INvt  Good for her! But I can't stop thinking about poor girls from the countries where women are not treated equally. 
So much of human potential is lost because of this.
2. "Sharia Law Swallowing Indonesia

by Mohshin Habib  February 7, 2013 at 3:00 am

http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/3579/indonesia-sharia

Indonesia, once a country of diversity, is now becoming 
a place for one-way Islam.
Although Indonesia, "the world largest Muslim country"
with an 87% Muslim population, was once considered a 
moderate Muslim country, day by day it has been leaning
more and more towards conservative Islam and Sharia 
laws. Initiated in 2009, bylaws in the light 
of Sharia rulings were implemented that conflict
with the values of human rights, and are
creating a difficult land for minorities to live in.
Indonesian Aceh province authorities recently launched an
initiative, despite opposition from human rights activists,
to ban women from straddling motorcycle when riding behind 
a man. Suaidi Yahia, mayor of Lhokseumawe, the second large
city of the province, said to the Associated Press, "It is
improper for women to sit astride. We implement Islamic
law here." He later said, "women sitting on motorbikes must
not sit astride: it will provoke the male drivers." Instead,
they allow women to sit sidesaddle, which is dangerous
on a motorcycle."

Then a few maps:

 

Read the rest of this entry »

So offended…

In Uncategorized on April 18, 2012 at 06:03

I actually think freedom of speech and expression means people should grow over being offended by what others think or say. Just ignore them or laugh at them. I feel it is religious fanatics and nationalists who get offended the most – so why we should join them? People should be allowed to ridicule them freely if they want to and also to explain freely why they are wrong. I think the open discussion is always better than kindergarten-ish, immature “I’m offended and I’m reporting you” attitude. In some cases ignoring somebody may work wonders. Imagine a preacher screaming on a street corner “You’ll go to Hell if you don’t listen to me!” And nobody even turn his or her head… That’s humiliation.


Words “stupid”, “ugly”, “fat” are very offending. Would they be banned one day? At the moment its looks like the most important is the size of minority somebody has offended. If its negligible or powerless to protest – its OK…


All this charges for inciting violence and even just hatred… It is peoples choice what to say. It is your choice either plunge yourself into hatred and violence because of what you heard – or not. It is your personal responsibility.

I think kids should be educated to think free, to try to understand others, to count possible consequences of their own actions.  Not to be afraid to be persecuted for saying something offencive to somebody else. There is no freedom, no free thinking in that. And if you have an opinion there almost always will be somebody offended by it.

Saudi Journalist Tweets Against Prophet Muhammad, Gets Death Sentence

In Uncategorized on February 13, 2012 at 07:04

by | Sunday, 12th Feb 2012

With its rising popularity, Twitter has given a new meaning to free speech and highly engaging global communications. However, this popularity has come for a price. The opinions and sentiments that people tweet are being used as evidence against them, increasingly. This threatens the aura around Twitter, and the recent censorship attempts by various governments taint its image further.

Recently, A Saudi Journalist, Hamza Kashgari, was extradited from Malaysia, for making seemingly blasphemous remarks on Prophet Muhammad. To make matters worse, Interpol was forced to hand over Kashgari. This same Interpol is supposed to remain politically neutral, and not intervene on cases of military, religious or racial nature. Article 3 of the Interpol’s constitution clearly states that

It is strictly forbidden for the Organization to undertake any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character.

The Guardian reports this incident, saying,

Kashgari, a newspaper columnist, fled Saudi Arabia after posting a tweet on the prophet’s birthday that sparked more than 30,000 responses and several death threats. The posting, which was later deleted, read: “I have loved things about you, I have hated things about you, and there is a lot I don’t understand about you … I will not pray for you.”

Kasgari is a 23-year-old journalist and faces the death penalty for this deed. This matter proves once again that regional laws govern the use of Twitter. It is only time before someone points a finger at the things we tweet.

Poland fines pop music star for blasphemy

In Uncategorized on January 24, 2012 at 16:54

Poland last week fined one its pop music stars $1,450 for stating in an interview several years ago that the Bible is full of “unbelievable tales” that are hard to accept because “it’s hard to believe in something written down by someone drunk on wine and smoking some kind of herbs.”

Dorota Rabczewska, otherwise known as Doda, was charged under a law that protects the feelings and sentiments of religious believers in the heavily Roman Catholic country. The law dictates that charges are brought if at least two complaints are filed. Doda’s statements apparently bothered a sufficient number of people, including Ryszard Nowak, chairman of the Christian advocacy organization Committee for the Defence Against Sects, who said: 

“It is clear that Doda thinks that the Bible was written by drunkards and junkies. I believe that she committed a crime and offended the religious feelings of both Christians and Jews.” ….

Rushdie’s Lit Festival No-Show: A Defeat for Free Expression in India

In Uncategorized on January 21, 2012 at 07:48

Salman Rushdie cancelled his scheduled appearance at the Jaipur Literary Festival on Friday with an explanation worthy of one of his own improbable plotlines: “I have now been informed by intelligence sources in Maharashtra and Rajasthan that paid assassins from the Mumbai underworld may be on their way to eliminate me.”

Would that it were fiction. Rushdie’s presence at the festival — a five-day, open-air bookapalooza on the grounds of an old palace in the western Indian state of Rajasthan — has been uncertain since earlier this month, when a politician campaigning in local elections in another state made a play for Muslim votes with the absurd claim that the rival Congress Party had invited Rushdie to India and ought to cancel his visa to show that it was sensitive to their concerns (Rushdie was invited by festival organizers and doesn’t need a visa). An influential Muslim cleric then said Rushdie had “hurt the sentiments of Muslims all over the world” and called for him to be denied entry. That was enough to rouse the long-dormant controversy over Rushdie’s novel The Satanic Verses and serve an easy election issue that politicians could pander to with either fiery rhetoric or timid silence.

Indonesian Charged With Blasphemy for Atheist Post

In Uncategorized on January 21, 2012 at 07:40

Indonesian police say a civil servant who posted “God does not exist” on Facebook faces a maximum penalty of five years behind bars for blasphemy.

Thirty-one-year-old Alexander Aan was taken into police custody Friday after his remarks triggered public outcry in West Sumatra province.

He was attacked by a mob on his way to work.

Indonesia, a predominantly Muslim nation of 240 million, recognizes the right to practice five other religions. But atheism is illegal.

Col. Chairul Azis, police chief in the West Sumatran district of Dharmasraya, says Aan was charged because he used the social networking site to spread beliefs that violate the law.

He says Aan also lied on his job application by claiming he was Muslim.

Hello again, Big Brother…

In Uncategorized on November 12, 2011 at 08:51

Its just as bad as during Soviet times sometime. Political correctness, spin and citizens constantly spying on citizens. Day after day there is something on the news – neighbours being filmed secretly over the fence, so called “friends” reporting private conversations and so on. Yes, real criminals should be punished, but at what price?

I am actually a person who, unfortunately, could be easily offended by any word (but also fast to forgive & forget) so I just can’t understand how any even slightly “politically incorrect” unintentional word is considered almost a crime nowadays. Somebody always will be offended by one thing or another. But its presumably OK to hate your neighbours, spy on them and report them. And to have one-sided national news coverage on many occasions – that’s not politically incorrect.

“Oh, Hello!” – just waiving to the next door camera pointing directly at our kitchen window. And this is probably one of the most low-crime places on Earth…

12 February 2009

Zoo Principle

In Uncategorized on November 7, 2011 at 14:35

Its almost everywhere now. Any party, committee, members of staff, artists on exhibition, every kind of people has to be represented everywhere. “We haven’t got enough women firefighters” – we hear on the news. And there should be a person from every race or ethnicity or ability for every group. Why? To tick the box? If there would be real equality nobody would ask which type of person you are, the only important thing would be if you can do you job well. Having “Women in Art” museums and exhibitions without “Men in Art” next door is not an acknowledgement but patronising.

Dragging crowds of woman into army, police, government, etc. is plain stupid. There are less of us here because we don’t generally want to be here. Men, I’m sorry, can’t breastfeed or get pregnant whatever governments are trying to tell us. And if all women are gone firefighting, who’s going to do these?(29 January2009)

Free speech

In Uncategorized on October 17, 2011 at 07:26

I don’t think free speech exists yet. We hear from time to time, that it didn’t existed in the Soviet Union, or it doesn’t exist in modern China. Well it doesn’t exist anywhere. Its just a pretense. Lets be honest. If you forbid saying anything offending – that is it. Any strong opinion on important matter can offend the opposite side. So governments, organizations, etc forbid some allegedly “bad” groups of people or individuals to speak on their own behalf. And what does that do? It turns them into martyrs for indecisive people. It shows to those who didn’t make heir opinion yet – the government is afraid that if “baddies” speak, they will take over, that they may actually have truth on their side. Its so easy to wave your sword at somebody who is not allowed to do so in our “civilized” society. For me its strange, how on Earth you can convince somebody what’s right and what’s wrong if you don’t let other side publicly defend itself?

Of course no viable government will allow open propaganda against itself on the prime time TV. Its understandable. Of course children should be protected from unappropriated content. But why not have a web site (or a radio station) easily accessible for all adults where absolutely anything could be said, any opinion discussed, and where any crazy lunatic could explain his or her point of view (and being praised or remotely”beaten” for that). And then, we WOULD have freedom of speech. 0 comments Links to this post

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