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Posts Tagged ‘law’

a “Christmas gift”

In Uncategorized on November 15, 2012 at 21:09

Uganda will pass a new law against homosexuality by the end of 2012 as a “Christmas gift” to its advocates, the speaker of parliament has said.

The AP news agency quoted Rebecca Kadaga as saying that Ugandans were “demanding” the law.

Homosexual acts are already illegal in Uganda, but the bill which is before parliament proposes tougher sentences for people convicted.

Foreign donors have threatened to cut aid if gay rights are not respected.
The bill, tabled by MP David Bahati, proposes jail terms for homosexual acts, including a life sentence in certain circumstances.

It prohibits the “promotion” of gay rights and calls for the punishment of anyone who “funds or sponsors homosexuality” or “abets homosexuality”.

Teen forced to marry rapist

In Uncategorized on July 1, 2012 at 09:20

Comment on this story


Amman – The ordeal of a 14-year-old girl who was kidnapped and raped repeatedly for three days has infuriated Jordanians, especially when her attacker agreed to marry her to avoid going to jail.

In conservative Muslim societies like Jordan, rapists can walk free thanks to penal code Article 308, known as the “rape-law.”

In April, the unidentified girl was shopping in the northern city of Zarqa when a 19-year-old man kidnapped her, took her to the desert where he had a pitched a tent and raped her for three consecutive days, judicial sources said.

Police found the girl during a routine patrol, drove her back to her family home and arrested the man.

Within days news emerged that the boy had agreed to marry the girl, while all charges against him have been dropped.

Earlier this month, another girl, aged 15, was talked into following a young man to an empty apartment in Amman where she was also raped.

Judicial sources say the young man is now desperately trying to work out an arrangement with her family to marry her, to avoid going to jail.

Article 308 allows rape charges to be dropped if the perpetrator agrees to marry the victim. He cannot divorce the woman for five years.

“This article of the law not only helps perpetrators walk free, it rewards them by allowing them to marry their victims, who get punished… for God knows what,” Nadia Shamrukh, head of the Jordanian Women’s Union, told AFP.

“By applying this law, another crime is committed. How can this 14-year-old girl, who is a minor anyway, marry her rapist? Can you imagine this?”

The rape of a child under the age of 15 is punishable by death in Jordan, which recorded 379 cases of rape in 2010, according to court documents.

“In one case, we tried so hard to prevent a rapist from marrying an 18-year-old girl, who did not want to end up being his wife,” said Eva Abu Halaweh, a lawyer and human rights activist who heads law group Mizan.

“But the girl’s father struck a deal with the unemployed rapist, who was already married to another woman and had six children. He was unable to provide for his family and his wife was a beggar.”

Abu Halaweh said the law is “inefficient anyway.”

“It should be scrapped. What if a girl gets raped by more than one man? In this case, Article 308 will fail to address the problem,” she said.

“Even if the victim does not resist marrying her rapist, he should not walk free… The penalty could be reduced.”

But Israa Tawalbeh, the country’s first woman coroner, sees “nothing wrong in Article 308 as such.”

“The problem is how some local and international human rights groups interpret the law,” she told AFP.

“Actual rape cases are rare in our society. Sometimes, girls under 18 lose their virginity to force their families to accept marriage to their boyfriends. The law categorises this as rape.”

Tawalbeh said the law “solves problems for some.”

“Accepting marriage under Article 308 is better than leaving girls to be killed by their parents or relatives,” she said.

“I think the law fits our society and reality. It protects the girls by forcing attackers to marry them.”

In Jordan, between 15 and 20 women are murdered annually in the name of “honour” and at least six such killings have been reported so far this year, according to authorities.

Murder is punishable by death, but in “honour killings,” courts sometimes commute or reduce sentences.

But Hani Jahshan, who is a forensic pathologist and physician at the health ministry and the Family Protection Directorate, has a quite different view of Article 308.

“This law is a stark violation of rights of women and children,” he said “Sexual violence has a deep impact on victims that could last for a long time, and if a raped girl marries her rapist, her suffering will only be aggravated.”

Jahshan blamed social misconceptions.

“Society believes that a female’s virginity must be preserved until marriage. This forces girls to marry their rapists in order to protect her reputation and avoid social problems,” he said.

Jordanians, particularly women activists, have held several street protests against the law.

“This issue must be effectively addressed,” Nadia Hashem Alul, Jordan’s first state minister for women’s affairs, told AFP. “I think Article 308 should be amended to ensure justice to rape victims.” – Sapa-AFP

So offended…

In freedom on April 18, 2012 at 06:00

I actually think freedom of speech and expression means people should grow over being offended by what others think or say. Just ignore them or laugh at them. I feel it is religious fanatics and nationalists who get offended the most – so why we should join them? People should be allowed to ridicule them freely if they want to and also to explain freely why they are wrong. I think the open discussion is always better than kindergarten-ish, immature “I’m offended and I’m reporting you” attitude. In some cases ignoring somebody may work wonders. Imagine a preacher screaming on a street corner “You’ll go to Hell if you don’t listen to me!” And nobody even turn his or her head… That’s humiliation.


Words “stupid”, “ugly”, “fat” are very offending. Would they be banned one day? At the moment its looks like the most important is the size of minority somebody has offended. If its negligible or powerless to protest – its OK…


All this charges for inciting violence and even just hatred… It is peoples choice what to say. It is your choice either plunge yourself into hatred and violence because of what you heard – or not. It is your personal responsibility.

I think kids should be educated to think free, to try to understand others, to count possible consequences of their own actions.  Not to be afraid to be persecuted for saying something offencive to somebody else. There is no freedom, no free thinking in that. And if you have an opinion there almost always will be somebody offended by it.

Greed

In Uncategorized on January 18, 2012 at 08:23

People are surprised by greedy bankers. But they are ones who choose to work with money, what do you expect? Far more surprising is greed among creative people, among artists.

It is obviously morally wrong when you take somebody’s else work as it is and call it yours, even worse if you start selling it as yours. Everybody knows that. People will turn away from an artist who does this.

But most of the rest of “copyright wars” is nonsense and greed. Art is impossible without derivative works.

This is how we are learning, this is how we preserve our heritage. As it was said by Picasso: “Good Artists Copy; Great Artists Steal”. All this “just you try to mention a character from my novel and you’ll be sorry”, “just you try to even remotely base you drawing on my photograph…”, “just you try to sing my song at home and put it on YouTube…”, “just try and press this share button next to my artwork”… and so on is pure greed and stupidity.

Its also an issue of being a famous artist: I’ve seen them using magazine cuttings, etc in their collages freely. An ordinary artist could be accused in stealing for that. Yet the law should be the same for everyone.

Saudi King Reverses Punishment For Woman Caught Driving

In Uncategorized on October 1, 2011 at 06:58

Saudi King Abdullah has overturned a court ruling sentencing a Saudi woman to be lashed 10 times for defying the kingdom’s ban on female drivers, a government official said Wednesday.

The official declined to elaborate on the monarch’s decision, and spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief the media.

A Saudi court on Tuesday found Shaima Jastaina guilty of violating the driving ban, and sentenced her to 10 lashes. The verdict took Saudi women by surprise, coming just a day after King Abdullah promised to protect women’s rights and decreed that women would be allowed to participate in municipal elections in 2015. Abdullah also promised to appoint women to a currently all-male advisory body known as the Shura Council.

Fireworks

In Uncategorized on September 7, 2011 at 11:39

I know some people would like to ban fireworks completely because they dangerous and frighten animals. My opinion: people of all ages should be allowed to have fun. Especially kids.

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