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Posts Tagged ‘religion’

It’s OK as long as its not harmfull

In ethics, freedom, philosophy, relationship, religion on June 23, 2013 at 08:12

John Gray said in a recent interview: “I don’t care what people believe, unless it is in some way demonstrably toxic or harmful.”  This is somebody posing as original critical thinker – yet the phrase describes probably most of us with various opinions about many subjects. Each human think of different ideas as harmful, that’s it. Any religious fanatic would think that not following his understanding of his religion is harmful to people and he, being, of course, concerned about everybody’s wellbeing, would go any distance to convert all of us, to protect us from harm. Lots of horrible things are done not because of hatred but because of compassion, because of will to help to some “lost sheep”.  Non-fanatics may think the same, but they won’t actively go and try to “rescue” everybody they meet. Unless you live a life of apathy and indifference, you would find ideas, beliefs, sets of mind that you think are harmful. It could be just a waste of time in you opinion, or you could think “this may lead to violence, and that’s bad”.  Do psychologists, sociologist, historians, brain scientists write on when, how and which ideas become destructive for individuals or societies? Do they publish the results openly, without fear of offending supporters of these ideas? This may bring some clarity. Or maybe not, as the experts would probably disagree on what is destructive. For example, how much anger, procrastination or indifference is OK for each of us, could violent outbreaks in history lead to better future, etc…

What John Gray is afraid? “… the idea that human beings are, by their very nature, free is the one of the most harmful fictions that has ever been promoted anywhere.” So there is example of somebody who is actually after your freedom. Harmful illusion it is…

Stone throwers

In good life, philosophy, relationship, religion on May 24, 2013 at 07:31

Imagine walking along a cliff. If a stone falls near you it may hurt. But there is another situation when it hurts so much more. Even if the stone didn’t actually hit you. It happens when a stone is thrown at you by somebody. Yes. This is one reason why the day I’ve  left religion was my happiest one. Not just every random misfortune vent from an all-powerful god but ultimately I have been forced to think that I deserved it… Life is beautiful when random is left alone for what it is.

Some thoughts on the interview with Jim Al-Khalili

In about me, ethics, freedom, good life, moral issues, philosophy, relationship, religion on March 8, 2013 at 14:24

http://rationalist.org.uk/articles/4070/facing-the-future-an-interview-with-jim-al-khalili

I agree that humanists should work more on the positive side of secular life, on creating the society which would be caring, loving, tolerant. But I can’t agree with accepting these Christian statements as rules. Turning the other cheek in many cases would give the wrong message to an offender. And different people call different things “love”. I still remember being told that to love in Christian understanding is to wish to a person being saved by God… That’s all.

I am a bit worried to hear about “good manners” when there still is inequality and injustice backed up by religions on this planet.

Maybe I was lucky – I’ve never seen atheists knocking on doors or surrounding people on the streets with the purpose of converting. .. I think some of us feel themselves as an offending side only because of the hyper sensitivity of many religious people to slightest disagreement with their views.

I respect kindness, courage, honesty, creativity, everybody’s right for self-expression but how could I “respect views” with which I disagree? And is a person civilized because of his or her “political correctness” or rather because that person can’t tolerate another person being abused?

I also think it is very important for secular people to stop mimicking religious ones. We don’t need “atheist churches” or ” humanist bibles”. We should work on positive and original self-identification, promote various aspects of secular lifestyle.

On changing attitudes

In art, ethics, good life, moral issues, people, philosophy, religion, time, traditions, writing on March 2, 2013 at 12:51

“I don’t believe in witches, but I don’t call myself an ahexist.”- this is Jonathan Miller saying “No” to negative self-definition. Fortunately it is normal now in the West not to believe in witches and other supernatural stuff. Calling somebody atheist is a bit strange really.

Recently a woman came to my shop and asked me if I want some leaflets for single parents. .. I was a bit surprised and said I am not a single parent and she may leave her leaflets at the designated area of the Market. She wouldn’t leave. “Look, there is more useful information in there”. Even more surprised, I looked. After first paragraph the word “Bible” started to creep in. This is what it was all about! I asked her few questions about why she believed (“Jesus told me” and “it’s the most printed book in the world”), asked her about horrible facts from her favourite book (she approved genocide with ease) and shamed her for trying to brainwash people. And with stealth too – wich was dishonest and disgusting – but this shows how ashamed they are themselves about their own teachings.

Two Mormon girls who surrounded me on the street few days later have been slightly more open. “We do not trying to change your mind, just come to us and be happy! ” Really? What if I am already happy? No reply. Why do you believe the stuff you teach? “Because we feel that it is so”… Well, I don’t. The funniest thing was that they turned out to be from Russia too – in the middle of the conversation. Probably they were from the Ural or Siberia. New Russian export – the Mormons…

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Religious “love”

In ethics, history, moral issues, people, philosophy, politics, relationship, religion, traditions on February 26, 2013 at 08:11
Lahore, Feb 21: A Pakistani court has begun hearing a petition seeking the reopening of an 84-year-old case in which a court under the British administration had given the death sentence to Ghazi Ilamuddin for murdering a Hindu writer named Raj Pal.

Lahore High Court Chief Justice Umer Ata Bandial heard arguments by the petitioner’s counsel on the maintainability of the plea yesterday and adjourned the case till March 14.

Ilamuddin killed Raj Pal for allegedly committing blasphemy against the Prophet Muhammad and was sentenced to death by British judges of the Lahore High Court in 1929.

Imtiaz Rasheed Qureshi of the “Save the Judiciary Committee” has filed the petition for reopening the case and exonerating Ilamuddin.

Farooq Hasan, the counsel for Qureshi, argued Raj Pal had included blasphemous material in his book and had “invited his death“.

He said: “Ghazi Ilamudin had no personal grudge with Pal and acted only out of love for the Prophet like a true Muslim.

Hasan requested the court to set aside the impugned order by exercising the principle of review.

Qureshi asked the court to direct authorities to honour Ilamuddin with state awards.

He also requested the court to direct the government to arrange a state funeral for Ilamuddin after declaring him “not guilty”.

You may think this is possible only in Pakistan and so on. Wrong. I have heard a person calling himself an Orthodox Christian saying “O, Lord, forgive us: we forgot how to die and kill for our faith”.

Remember the trial of  Pussy riot.  The patriarch of Moscow and All Russia, Kirill I, and Vsevolod Chaplin, chairman of the Synodal Department for the Cooperation of Church (Russia’s “Great Inquisitor”) condemned Pussy Riot’s actions as “blasphemous“, the patriarch was saying that the “Devil has laughed at all of us … We have no future if we allow mockery in front of great shrines, and if some see such mockery as a sort of bravery, an expression of political protest, an acceptable action or a harmless joke.”[65] 

Years in prison because somebody thinks they offended his imaginary friendHere a typical Orthodox fanatic says “no mercy” to them.

Remember the witches. There is no magic, of course, but christians are still afraid of it. “Witchcraft is dangerous“… You don’t find apologies to innocent ladies burned by priests here. Read the rest of this entry »

A bit of TOK

In интернет, ethics, moral issues, philosophy, relationship, religion, traditions, writing on February 18, 2013 at 12:54

Church of England nixes female bishops. Do religions treat women as inferior?

Its a sort of traditional “social darwinism” backed up by old religions: all because unlike men women can only have one child (or one set of multiples) from one father per year and human males traditionally fight over females. THIS is what traditional religions protect while our civilization already has outgrown attitudes like that. Zeitgeist is to treat women as humans and care for week & disabled.

Is Atheism a Religion?

1. You don’t define people as non-astrologist or non-fortune-tellers. 2. Religion equals beliefs in something supernatural (spiritual) plus priests, prayers, books, temples, legends. A-theist obviosely don’t have that. Religious peple must be so desperate trying to prove that what they call “atheism” is just the same thing. So they don’t feel left behind.

https://apps.facebook.com/tokmedia/toks?id=f8144079-e34e-4fe4-a57a-f02fa1905b34

Maps of human potential and its waste

In взаимоотношения, мораль, наука, отношения, ethics, freedom, good life, legal issues, moral issues, религия, свобода, традиции, people, places, relationship, religion, traditions on February 11, 2013 at 08:59

First, two news items:


1. "Three-year-old girl joins Mensa with an IQ ‘higher than
Stephen Hawking’ to become just one of 18 pre-school members
  • Alice Amos, from Guildford, Surrey, scored 162 in the Stanford Binet test
  • The toddler is already bilingual, speaking both English and Russian
  • Her IQ matches some of the world's most notable intellectuals both past and present"
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2275775/Three-year-old-girl-joins-Mensa-IQ-higher-Stephen-Hawking-just-18-pre-school-members.html#ixzz2KZn9INvt  Good for her! But I can't stop thinking about poor girls from the countries where women are not treated equally. 
So much of human potential is lost because of this.
2. "Sharia Law Swallowing Indonesia

by Mohshin Habib  February 7, 2013 at 3:00 am

http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/3579/indonesia-sharia

Indonesia, once a country of diversity, is now becoming 
a place for one-way Islam.
Although Indonesia, "the world largest Muslim country"
with an 87% Muslim population, was once considered a 
moderate Muslim country, day by day it has been leaning
more and more towards conservative Islam and Sharia 
laws. Initiated in 2009, bylaws in the light 
of Sharia rulings were implemented that conflict
with the values of human rights, and are
creating a difficult land for minorities to live in.
Indonesian Aceh province authorities recently launched an
initiative, despite opposition from human rights activists,
to ban women from straddling motorcycle when riding behind 
a man. Suaidi Yahia, mayor of Lhokseumawe, the second large
city of the province, said to the Associated Press, "It is
improper for women to sit astride. We implement Islamic
law here." He later said, "women sitting on motorbikes must
not sit astride: it will provoke the male drivers." Instead,
they allow women to sit sidesaddle, which is dangerous
on a motorcycle."

Then a few maps:

 

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on Judging

In взаимоотношения, мораль, отношения, психология, ethics, good life, moral issues, религия, философия, христианство, people, philosophy, relationship, religion on February 7, 2013 at 08:24

“Do not judge, or you too will be judged” they will tell you. Do not judge – and learn from your own mistakes. Judge – and learn from the mistakes of others. More efficient.

Do not judge – and somebody else never will learn a lesson and will be carrying on doing wrong to you – or to others. Judge openly. Sometime people do not understand that they did something wrong UNLESS they are told off.

—————

“Не судите, да не судимы будете”, – скажут вам. Если вы будете себя вести подобным образом, вам придется учиться только на своих ошибках. Судите – и учитесь на ошибках других. Быстрее и качественнее.

Не судите, и тот, кто обидел вас, пойдет обижать дальше. Часто люди не понимают, что сделали что-то не так, если им никто не скажет, не осудит их в открытую.

Theocracy & dictatorship

In freedom, Human-made, politics, relationship, religion, traditions on February 6, 2013 at 10:44

What’s worse? Of course the first one. If people have just a dictator (or dictators) they know he has been put here by the power of human beings and could be removed by their power too. Theocracy is based on self-deceiving, self-enslavement. People are thinking that current order is created by a deity and are powerless even to dream about any escape… Such a sad picture.

Petitioning Islamic Governments Decriminalise Apostasy

In мораль, ethics, freedom, good life, legal issues, moral issues, религия, традиции, people, places, politics, religion, traditions on February 5, 2013 at 11:48

THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT.

Petition by
Silenced People
Islamic Prison, Iran, Islamic Republic of

http://www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/decriminalise-apostasy#

Being an Ex-Muslim should not be illegal

The following countries have outlawed Apostasy

Apostasy means leaving religion, for example becoming an ex-Muslim.

Iran – DEATH penalty
Egypt –  DEATH  penalty
Pakistan –  DEATH penalty since 2007
United Arab Emirates –  DEATH penalty
Somalia –  DEATH penalty
Afghanistan –  DEATH penalty
Saudi Arabia –  DEATH penalty
Sudan –  DEATH penalty
Qatar –  DEATH  penalty
Yemen –  DEATH  penalty
Mauritania –  DEATH  penalty
Syria –  DEATH  penalty
Jordan – Fine, jail, child custody loss, marriage annulment. Although officials claim otherwise, convictions are recorded for apostasy.
Malaysia – ILLEGAL in five of 13 states (fine, imprisonment, and flogging)
Morocco –  ILLEGAL to proselytise conversion (15 years jail, flogging)
Algeria –  ILLEGAL to proselytise conversion from Islam, store or circulate materials destabilizing attachment to Islam (2-5 years jail, about 5000-10,000 euros fine)

Universal Declaration of Human Rights
Laws prohibiting religious conversion run contrary to Article 18 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, which states: “Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion; this right includes freedom to change his religion or belief.”
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