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Posts Tagged ‘time’

In Uncategorized on October 31, 2011 at 09:34

What lies behind us, and what lies
before us are small matters
compared to what lies within us.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

In Uncategorized on October 31, 2011 at 09:31

Living is like tearing through a museum. Not until later do you really start absorbing what you saw, thinking about it, looking it up in a book, and remembering – because you can’t take it in all at once.

Audrey Hepburn

In Uncategorized on October 6, 2011 at 09:48

Tell the Time with Postman Pat Fun Kids Hardcover Book

Anachronism

In Uncategorized on September 27, 2011 at 04:57

Science moves forward, but the rest of human activities is not necessary does so. Many of so called new ideas are just well forgotten old ones. Read a diary or an article from long ago you will see that the problems bothering people didn’t change much. What they call “modern art” is often at least forty years old. Since Renaissance people have been rediscovering what Greek philosophers knew from long ago. The thing that changed is that human life became more precious – and that is a good thing.

In Uncategorized on August 19, 2011 at 08:25

A Time for Everything?

Once it seemed there would always be
a time for everything.
Ages passed I knew at last
my life had never been.
I’d been missing what time could bring.

Fifty years and I’m filled with tears and joys
I never cried.
Burn the wagon and chain the mule.
The past is all denied.
There’s no time for everything.
No time for everything.

Jethro Tull / Ian Anderson

Art Calendars for 2010

In acrylic, art, autumn, my artworks, nude, oil pastel, pastel, pen and ink, pencil, seaside, spring, summer, time, watercolour, winter on October 20, 2009 at 09:22
Distant Lands Fine Art Calendar calendar
Distant Lands Fine Art Calendar by Linandara

My Russia by A.Cook

My Russia by A.CookMy Russia by A.Cook (calendar)

Print: £12.49

This is 14-month calendar for 2010 illustrated with my own paintings and drawings dedicated to landscapes, people and buildings of my native Russia. Contains British and US holidays. If you would like other / custom holidays please let me know before buying and I’ll create additional version for you. I hope you’ll enjoy my calendar!

Distant Lands by A.Cook

Distant Lands by A.CookDistant Lands by A.Cook (calendar)

Print: £12.49

Welcome to the Distant Lands! Nineteen of my artworks (mostly seasonal landscapes) are included in this 2010 14-month calendar. It has British & Christian holidays (could be changed – just send me a message). I hope you’ll enjoy it!

Fantasy Lands by A.Cook

Fantasy Lands by A.CookFantasy Lands by A.Cook (calendar)

Print: £12.49

This it 14 months 2010 calendar illustrated with my fantasy artwork. It contain British & US holidays (this could be changed – just send me a message). I hope you will enjoy it.

School blues

In healthy life, kids, time, traditions on December 12, 2008 at 12:10

I had a happy childhood. Of course I hated or laughed at all that communist staff but I was so lucky with teachers at school and plenty of friends. I hope my kids will remember their school years with happiness and warmth too.

I started school at eight and this didn’t stop me (or any of my friends in Russia) from getting to universities and colleges we liked. I’ve been shocked when at the time my kids were something like 3.5 or 4.5 a nearby school head teacher knocked on our door and said its time for my little ones to go to their Nursery (just for a couple of hours first). As I didn’t have any friends in this country, nobody for my kids to play with, and I wanted to do more art at home, I decided, OK, lets do it. It wasn’t easy for my son to fit in at first. Once when he didn’t want to get inside after a play time, a teacher grabbed and pulled him and he, scarred, baited her in the arm. Needless to say we received a very angry letter from school, got really terrified and had to apologise.

We and kids started to have colds continuously. And little ones started getting head lice. My husband and me we haven’t had them at schools – full stop. My mother-in-law didn’t had this problem in Britain, same my mother in Russia. Even in my grandmother times, during famine and incredible poverty of 1920s on the boundary of Russia, Ukraine and Belorussia, they didn’t had much of this head lice issue. So why its so bad in modern British and Welsh schools? Well it either 1) parents don’t care for the welfare of their kids so much now; or 2) headlice got more resistant to treatment; or 3) kids are starting school too early when they can’t understand that they shouldn’t touch each other heads; or 4) they encouraged to sit on the floor rather than at desks as we did, and that helps little insects spread; or combination of these.

In Russia kids haven’t been allowed to walk (almost everybody walked, of course) in school wearing outdoor shoes. You had to have a pair of clean ones to change. NOT HERE. All that dogs, birds, rabbits, cats droppings on the way end up in the classroom… Where everybody sits on the floor. Brrr…

There is a VERY STRANGE attitude to sweets in school. They are encouraged! Its your birthday – bring sweets for everybody, you have been good at studying – get a sweet. School parties of course only have sweets and cakes to eat. No surprise, the life expectancy is falling.

When we decided to move to Wales, people were saying how better the schools there are. We were delighted to here about it. What a disappointment! Our children had been doing joint writing for about a year, but here they have been FORBIDDEN to do this. Only typing (I can’t TYPE letters at all!). They had started a foreign language (French) but now have to forget about this because they are learning a little bit of Welsh (why not have both?). They also had to go back to reading very simple books again. At least now they have a free swimming lesson a week (but my daughter said they DON’T HAVE P.E. IN WINTER). My husband can’t forget his football at school in any weather, and I quite enjoyed skiing for 2 hours a week through winter wonderland in the park next to the school (the park is long gone under some apartment blocks in Moscow, but that’s another story). So they start early but they exercise less… Here is a good recipe for childhood obesity. Plus school meals. In England kids actually had some organic food for their dinners. Not here – and that’s for the same price. And some form of potatoes almost every day.

Two more things make me really sad: encouragement of football and pop / rock music culture. When I was at school we were told to strive for the best. If its music, it should be quality music. We don’t listen to much pop or rock at home. It’s not OUR culture. Now my kids are preparing for their Christmas concert and they have to pretend TO BE ROCK OR POP STARS. Something called X-factor? I have no slightest idea what it is (I only know X-files :). In England we had to choose if we want to send the kids to school discos or not. Here in Wales they are hold in SCHOOL TIME. And foolball. We don’t watch sport. All we see is drunken and swearing supporters we have to share trains with. Why our kids should be pushed towards that?

Sorry for some bitterness. Of course there are lots of positive things. Religious education has been good so far (I haven’t had any in my time). Kids had interesting trips to farms and theaters. There are quite a lot of male teachers (unlike when I was at school), and most teachers looks like clever and friendly people. And there are affordable music lessons for everyone. I sort of admire home education enthusiasts but I wouldn’t be able to do this. At least not alone. Anyway, hopefully, everything will be for the best.

Life without Google

In computers, time on November 25, 2008 at 07:28

I can’t stop thinking: what if this crisis kills Internet? Or something else does? What we are going to do? By the way there is new Survivors TV series (remake) on BBC:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/pressoffice/pressreleases/stories/2008/05_may/30/survivors.shtml

I don’t know yet if its going to be any good but feels somehow possible now. What scares me the most its the loss of order, when everybody who is stronger takes what he or she wants. I just hope we never see it in real life!

Villages – Towns – Cities

In good life, healthy life, photography, time, traditions, xenophobia on November 18, 2008 at 09:50

White Horse Village – changing China:

I watched a bit of this programme yesterday

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/programmes/newsnight/5103100.stm

and was somehow surprised by a female presenter attitude. She pointed at a lady and said something like that this unfortunate one has to abandon the idea about going away to work in a factory, instead she is doomed to stay with her kids and work on a farm, and that’s such a hard work. Well, we switched the TV off after that. I think almost any way to earn money is hard, one way or another. It may be the stress (separation from family and home) or unhealthy lifestyle instead of the hard physical work, but the hard bit is still here. Interestingly, I’ve heard there was some research showing that men’s health is worse if they stay at home all the time, women’s health is worse if they go away to work.

I haven’t been to China but I see how in the Russian countryside the city folk dreams to live close to the nature, not just stay here on holidays, but most of the village and small town dwellers wants to move to the city, to give up their land, to fill up yet another huge ugly apartment block. There used to be quite a lot of tension and hostility on the buses, but now the better off people unfortunately mostly use their cars.

Once I was walking through a village, seen a nice old house and decide to take picture of it (no, its not that one). Immediately a very angry elderly lady popped out and started shouting at me. I was surprised – I would count it for a compliment if people started to take pictures of my house or garden. Anyway, she disappeared next year – probably moved to a town…

So, I’m bothered with question: Why people who live close to nature, see the beauty every day, have fresh air to breath and birds to listen to, are often so unhappy, jealous and hostile? Are they already so deeply affected by modern consumer culture watching TV and doing their shopping in towns and cities? In that angry lady’s village, there are crowds of tourist and pilgrims passing by yet local folk don’t even try to organise any farmers market which would be of a great success and helped them to stay afloat, I think. Its just looks like they don’t want to be happy where they are. Even here, in Newtown (Wales) I recon my encounter with xenophobic hostile youngsters shows that there is a class of people why don’t feel any inspiration from marvelous countryside around them, instead they think themselves being on some unfortunate margin of modern society.

PS. And the size of local gardens doesn’t help either. All the fields around, but the ordinary person in Newtown is lucky to have enough land to hung the washing in the back garden! Not surprising there is not much connection to the land.

Meeting

In moral issues, Nottingham, photography, religion, time, traditions on November 15, 2008 at 07:53

I’ve stumbled upon an interesting photo from 2 or 3 years ago in my archive. Its from a medieval Robin Hood Pageant in Nottingham where different times and cultures meet. Not at all that I am advocating for this but I think people often forget that there was a tradition in Europe for women to cover their heads with scarfs and hats.

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