Завтра начинается Сегодня

Posts Tagged ‘women’s rights’

Maps of human potential and its waste

In взаимоотношения, мораль, наука, отношения, ethics, freedom, good life, legal issues, moral issues, религия, свобода, традиции, people, places, relationship, religion, traditions on February 11, 2013 at 08:59

First, two news items:


1. "Three-year-old girl joins Mensa with an IQ ‘higher than
Stephen Hawking’ to become just one of 18 pre-school members
  • Alice Amos, from Guildford, Surrey, scored 162 in the Stanford Binet test
  • The toddler is already bilingual, speaking both English and Russian
  • Her IQ matches some of the world's most notable intellectuals both past and present"
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2275775/Three-year-old-girl-joins-Mensa-IQ-higher-Stephen-Hawking-just-18-pre-school-members.html#ixzz2KZn9INvt  Good for her! But I can't stop thinking about poor girls from the countries where women are not treated equally. 
So much of human potential is lost because of this.
2. "Sharia Law Swallowing Indonesia

by Mohshin Habib  February 7, 2013 at 3:00 am

http://www.gatestoneinstitute.org/3579/indonesia-sharia

Indonesia, once a country of diversity, is now becoming 
a place for one-way Islam.
Although Indonesia, "the world largest Muslim country"
with an 87% Muslim population, was once considered a 
moderate Muslim country, day by day it has been leaning
more and more towards conservative Islam and Sharia 
laws. Initiated in 2009, bylaws in the light 
of Sharia rulings were implemented that conflict
with the values of human rights, and are
creating a difficult land for minorities to live in.
Indonesian Aceh province authorities recently launched an
initiative, despite opposition from human rights activists,
to ban women from straddling motorcycle when riding behind 
a man. Suaidi Yahia, mayor of Lhokseumawe, the second large
city of the province, said to the Associated Press, "It is
improper for women to sit astride. We implement Islamic
law here." He later said, "women sitting on motorbikes must
not sit astride: it will provoke the male drivers." Instead,
they allow women to sit sidesaddle, which is dangerous
on a motorcycle."

Then a few maps:

 

Read the rest of this entry »

An attack by Taliban gunmen in north-west Pakistan that wounded a 14-year-old who campaigned for girls’ rights

In Uncategorized on October 9, 2012 at 20:37

Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head on her way home from school in Mingora, the main town in the Swat Valley.

The president and prime minister have led condemnation of the attack.

Initial reports suggested she was out of danger, but there is growing concern over her condition with some reports saying she may need treatment abroad.

A Pakistani Taliban spokesman told the BBC they carried out the attack.

Ehsanullah Ehsan told BBC Urdu that they attacked her because she was anti-Taliban and secular, adding that she would not be spared.

Teen forced to marry rapist

In Uncategorized on July 1, 2012 at 09:20

Comment on this story


Amman – The ordeal of a 14-year-old girl who was kidnapped and raped repeatedly for three days has infuriated Jordanians, especially when her attacker agreed to marry her to avoid going to jail.

In conservative Muslim societies like Jordan, rapists can walk free thanks to penal code Article 308, known as the “rape-law.”

In April, the unidentified girl was shopping in the northern city of Zarqa when a 19-year-old man kidnapped her, took her to the desert where he had a pitched a tent and raped her for three consecutive days, judicial sources said.

Police found the girl during a routine patrol, drove her back to her family home and arrested the man.

Within days news emerged that the boy had agreed to marry the girl, while all charges against him have been dropped.

Earlier this month, another girl, aged 15, was talked into following a young man to an empty apartment in Amman where she was also raped.

Judicial sources say the young man is now desperately trying to work out an arrangement with her family to marry her, to avoid going to jail.

Article 308 allows rape charges to be dropped if the perpetrator agrees to marry the victim. He cannot divorce the woman for five years.

“This article of the law not only helps perpetrators walk free, it rewards them by allowing them to marry their victims, who get punished… for God knows what,” Nadia Shamrukh, head of the Jordanian Women’s Union, told AFP.

“By applying this law, another crime is committed. How can this 14-year-old girl, who is a minor anyway, marry her rapist? Can you imagine this?”

The rape of a child under the age of 15 is punishable by death in Jordan, which recorded 379 cases of rape in 2010, according to court documents.

“In one case, we tried so hard to prevent a rapist from marrying an 18-year-old girl, who did not want to end up being his wife,” said Eva Abu Halaweh, a lawyer and human rights activist who heads law group Mizan.

“But the girl’s father struck a deal with the unemployed rapist, who was already married to another woman and had six children. He was unable to provide for his family and his wife was a beggar.”

Abu Halaweh said the law is “inefficient anyway.”

“It should be scrapped. What if a girl gets raped by more than one man? In this case, Article 308 will fail to address the problem,” she said.

“Even if the victim does not resist marrying her rapist, he should not walk free… The penalty could be reduced.”

But Israa Tawalbeh, the country’s first woman coroner, sees “nothing wrong in Article 308 as such.”

“The problem is how some local and international human rights groups interpret the law,” she told AFP.

“Actual rape cases are rare in our society. Sometimes, girls under 18 lose their virginity to force their families to accept marriage to their boyfriends. The law categorises this as rape.”

Tawalbeh said the law “solves problems for some.”

“Accepting marriage under Article 308 is better than leaving girls to be killed by their parents or relatives,” she said.

“I think the law fits our society and reality. It protects the girls by forcing attackers to marry them.”

In Jordan, between 15 and 20 women are murdered annually in the name of “honour” and at least six such killings have been reported so far this year, according to authorities.

Murder is punishable by death, but in “honour killings,” courts sometimes commute or reduce sentences.

But Hani Jahshan, who is a forensic pathologist and physician at the health ministry and the Family Protection Directorate, has a quite different view of Article 308.

“This law is a stark violation of rights of women and children,” he said “Sexual violence has a deep impact on victims that could last for a long time, and if a raped girl marries her rapist, her suffering will only be aggravated.”

Jahshan blamed social misconceptions.

“Society believes that a female’s virginity must be preserved until marriage. This forces girls to marry their rapists in order to protect her reputation and avoid social problems,” he said.

Jordanians, particularly women activists, have held several street protests against the law.

“This issue must be effectively addressed,” Nadia Hashem Alul, Jordan’s first state minister for women’s affairs, told AFP. “I think Article 308 should be amended to ensure justice to rape victims.” – Sapa-AFP

Malawi women protest stripping attacks on streets over wearing trousers

In Uncategorized on January 21, 2012 at 08:43

By msnbc staff and news services

Women in Malawi plan to protest in the streets Friday over recent beatings by street-vendor mobs who beat and stripped naked several women for wearing trousers or miniskirts instead of the south Africa country’s traditional dress.

Malawi had laws until 1994 under the autocratic rule of Hastings Banda that banned women from wearing short skirts and men having long hair or flared trousers, the BBC reported. It dropped the restrictions when multi-party democracy was introduced.

However, this week street vendors attacked several women in Lilongwe and commercial capital Blantyre over their dress, saying they were enforcing a government decree.

Seodi White, a lawyer and leading women’s rights activist, told the BBC that protesters would gather Friday ”in solidarity with the victims and to express our indignation at such barbaric treatment of mothers, wives and daughters of our country”.

The immorality of Afghanistan’s ‘moral crimes’

In Uncategorized on January 21, 2012 at 07:56

“Please help us.”

Those were the first words that my client, Gulnaz, said when I met her inside the Kabul prison that was home to hundreds of women, many of whom, like her, were locked away for so-called moral crimes — adultery or running away from home. The frail 20-year-old clung to her baby, who was conceived through rape and born on the prison floor, where mother and child had lived for nearly two years.

Tearfully, Gulnaz recounted the story of the assault that took place in 2009. The attacker, nearly twice her age, pinned her down, tied her up and then savagely raped her. She described going to the police with her disabled, widowed mother to report the rape. There she was instantly imprisoned for reporting the crime. With no male head of household present, the two women were not taken seriously.

After years of advocacy by human rights groups and other activists, and a decade of war by the United States and its allies — a war in which the need to uphold the rights of women has often been invoked — Afghan women remain trapped in a legal system that often punishes them for being the victims of brutal crimes.

My illiterate client told me of her experience going to court with her illegitimate daughter and not understanding the legal process. She was forced to represent herself after her Afghan lawyer failed to show up, yet the judges who presided over the case refused to allow her to speak. Instead, they berated Gulnaz for lying, insisting that women cannot get pregnant by having sex just once. This assertion was the basis for the 12-year sentence that was imposed, with a wrenching caveat: Marrying her attacker would allow her to be “free.”

Unfortunately, Gulnaz’s case is not an anomaly but represents the situation that more than half of the imprisoned women in Afghanistan find themselves in — locked up for moral crimes, according to a recent studyby the United Nations.

Saudi King Reverses Punishment For Woman Caught Driving

In Uncategorized on October 1, 2011 at 06:58

Saudi King Abdullah has overturned a court ruling sentencing a Saudi woman to be lashed 10 times for defying the kingdom’s ban on female drivers, a government official said Wednesday.

The official declined to elaborate on the monarch’s decision, and spoke on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to brief the media.

A Saudi court on Tuesday found Shaima Jastaina guilty of violating the driving ban, and sentenced her to 10 lashes. The verdict took Saudi women by surprise, coming just a day after King Abdullah promised to protect women’s rights and decreed that women would be allowed to participate in municipal elections in 2015. Abdullah also promised to appoint women to a currently all-male advisory body known as the Shura Council.

%d bloggers like this: